How to Miss Olympic Lifts

Missed LiftsLike many of you that love Olympic lifting, whether it be for performance, CrossFit, or the sport itself, I was shocked when I heard last week that an athlete had suffered a serious and life altering injury from doing an Olympic lift. I received a dozen emails about how to “miss a lift,” and thought that this was an important time to release this blog post.

I don’t know Kevin Ogar, and I will not speak to the way that his injury occurred, I think that it would be very disrespectful to Kevin, his family, and friends. Personally I think this was a completely freak accident, a massively unfortunate, 1 in a billion occurrence. I only wish him the best, and will pray for his recovery.

This is a piece of an upcoming project I am putting together, and wanted to make sure it is out there to share.

Earning the Right to train Overhead: Eric Cressey on the snatch

The following post comes from Eric Cressey. Eric is world renowned as the “shoulder guy”, and in this post he gives you an assessment tool to see if you are ready to train overhead. Never have I seen such a simple assessment and simple corrections if you are found to be lacking. If you want to press, snatch, or jerk you must keep reading. 

Training Overhead Eric Cressey

Breathing in Weightlifting

Breathing LiftWe almost have a joke in our gym. I say almost, because it might be true in most cases, but we say this phrase so much that it makes us laugh almost every time one of our coaches blurts it out.

“It’s all comes back to breathing”

Breathing it seems has become a panacea of sorts to nearly all that ails us, our clients, and my athletes.

  • Bad squat mobility: Breathing.
  • Bad shoulder position: Breathing.
  • Back Pain: Breathing.

I am not exaggerating when I say that most (not all) problems that we encounter can be fixed or improved by breathing better.

External Cues for Olympic Lifting

External cues photoOlympic lifting is filled with cues for even the most minute details of the lifts. These lifts have been studied by sports scientists for decades and there are no real secrets to them anymore, as such it is common to hear jargon that is filled with precise internal focused coaching points.

  • Maintain a 30 degree torso angle.
  • Push the knees back until the shins are at vertical.
  • Externally rotate the shoulders overhead.

These are certainly valid points, but what athlete really has great command over the individual angles of their torso, hips and knees? Some athletes certainly do, but we have been working to diversify our coaching points to include more external focus cues.

My Weightlifting Gear

Olympic lifting gearI get questions all the time about what I use to train for weightlifting. The shoes I wear, the bumpers and bar I use, or what I would recommend for training, or for home gym set up, etc. There are plenty of choices, but in my experience the best options when price and quality are considered are what I try to get.

If you are interested in Olympic lifting, there are only a few things that you MUST have.

Bumpers-Without rubber plates you are going to have a very tough time dropping the weights over and over. Not that the weights or the floors won’t be able to handle it, but the impact of metal weights hitting the bar when dropped will eat through bars quick!.

Bar– A good weightlifting bar will mean you can put more weight on the bar without sacrificing your wrists, shoulders, etc.

Shoes– Weightlifting shoes are more than just nice to have. They give you an essential base of support, and open up your ankles for squatting deeper. Plenty of problems that I see with athletes in the clean and snatch can easily be cleared up simply with some weightlifting shoes.

Platform– While not 100% necessary, they are really nice to have, so I shared with you the way to build a platform in about 10 minutes.

There are plenty of other things that I like to use all the time and keep in my weightlifting bag, but those are all listed as miscellaneous.