Demystifying Depth Jumps

leg_press_musclesOne thing I have done in the past couple years is really work to surround myself with great coaches. One of those great coaches is Rod Root. Rod has become more than my right hand guy, he has become my go to guy. When it comes to all things, I ask Rod for his opinion before I finalize my own.

Rod has led the charge in developing our programs for basketball players and has helped to create multiple division 1 prospects and was the strength coach for the Indiana State Champion Girls basketball team that trained in our gym all fall and winter.

If you know basketball players like I do then you know that there is one thing on their mind at all times, jumping higher and dunking. When it comes to jumping higher the king of movements is the depth jump.

Below is a post about everything depth jumps, from Rod, be careful though, this program of depth jumps has gotten one of our 7th grade basketball players dunking. This stuff works, almost too well….

Hot Sleddy Action

Using a sled doesn’t suck.

-No One, ever

 The sled does suck, a lot, especially the way it is used in most instances: bent over, head down, puke muscles working in overdrive. I am here to tell you though that there are more uses to the sled than what you likely do everyday.

There is a place for explosive, fast pushing of the sled. We use it all the time for speed training and even in conditioning for our athletes (with tons of rest in between). These should be a part of your program, but just getting down on a low sled and pushing until someone pukes isn’t an effective way to train athletes.

In this post I am going to share with you the novel uses that are going to teach your athletes better locomotion patterns, challenge their entire body,  and help them improve their game.

So sit back and relax while you read it, but get ready to do some serious work as you put these to use! 

The Death of Quickness: Powerful Speed Training

Today I wanted to bring to you a guest post from my friend CJ Easter.  CJ is an awesome young coach out in California, who is just blowing things up by training athletes to get faster and more powerful. Before coaching CJ had the distinction of wearing #12 for the Stanford football team before this year’s number 1 draft pick in the NFL, Andrew Luck, wore it for the Cardinal.

CJ and I share the same viewpoints on how to truly train athletes to get faster and it doesn’t have a lot to do with “quickness”.

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Quickness” has been abused and misused…

And today, I am mercifully allowing it to rest in peace…
In the dictionary, quickness is defined as moving or functioning rapidly. Sounds like a desirable trait for our athletes, right?
And you are right… Quickness does have its place in our sports (especially mental quickness), but think about when we see an athlete move and say, “Wow, he’s quick!” we are most often referring to an athlete’s ability to change direction.

This type of “quickness” is not about how rapidly the arms and legs move. It is a powerful movement that consists of a number of other athletic qualities that we must understand to be able to train our athletes to change direction efficiently.
So let’s break down the athletic qualities that go into changing direction:

Coaching Speed Training: Get Faster with Resisted Sprinting

I am coming out and saying it right now. Speed training is not as complex as most people make it out to be.  There isn’t a need for $10,000 pieces of equipment (more power to you if you can afford them), there is a need however to coach the right things, and train the right ways. The right ways of training come down to two things.

When breaking down speed training we break down the training into the two categories we can have the maximal impact: Power and Technique.

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